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FDA panel backs Puma Biotech’s breast cancer drug

REUTERS: Puma Biotechnology’s experimental breast cancer drug reduces the risk of the disease returning and should be approved, an advisory committee to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration concluded on Wednesday, paving the way for its approval in patients who have already had their tumors surgically removed. The panel voted 12 to 4 in favor of the drug, neratinib, saying ...

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Cigarette filters may increase lung cancer risk

REUTERS: Cigarette filters, introduced decades ago to reduce the amount of tar smokers inhale, also alter other properties of smoke and smoking in a way that raises the risk of lung cancer, researchers say. In a review of research on changes in lung cancer rates, and changes in the types of lung cancer that are most common, the study authors ...

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Online pressure: When social media pushes new mothers close to the edge

  SINGAPORE: Everything Ms Malini Pravin Saivi read on social media painted a rosy picture of the pure, unconditional love a mother has for her newborn. So when she gave birth three years ago to a baby girl, she waited for that feeling. It did not come. “I’ve seen mothers posting (on Facebook) an hour after giving birth about how ...

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Outgoing WHO chief says world ‘better prepared’ for health crises

  GENEVA: The World Health Organisation’s outgoing chief Margaret Chan defended her legacy on Monday (May 22), insisting the world had become better prepared to face health emergencies like Ebola on her watch. In her final address to WHO’s member states, Chan acknowledged that mistakes had been made during her decade at the helm, but stressed that while “we falter ...

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The dark side of childbirth: When motherhood causes depression

Giving birth is supposed to be a joyous event and it is, for many. But postpartum depression affects 6 to 8 per cent of new mothers here according to one expert, and can have tragic consequences if neglected.SINGAPORE: Five years ago, the first-time mother nearly drowned her newborn son. The woman, who only wanted to be known as Ms Goh, ...

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Walking linked to improved brain function

  REUTERS: A moderate-intensity walking regimen may reduce symptoms of mild cognitive impairment that are linked to poor blood vessel health in the brain, a small study suggests. Participants with vascular cognitive impairment, sometimes called vascular dementia, who walked three hours per week for six months had improved reaction times and other signs of improved brain function, the Canadian team ...

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FDA warns of foot, leg amputations with J&J diabetes drug

REUTERS: Johnson & Johnson is required to add new warnings to its diabetes drug, Invokana, about the risk of foot and leg amputations, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Tuesday. Final results from two clinical trials showed leg and foot amputations occurred about twice as often in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with Invokana, known also as ...

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Lonely and ‘waiting to die’, Singapore’s elderly poor find hope in many helping hands

Poor health and mental illness isolate them from society. But a widening community network is striving to ease their loneliness and make sure they’re taken care of, in their final years. SINGAPORE: Her one-room flat was a cluttered mess, and Madam Helen Fernandez herself never seemed to bathe, said her neighbours who always saw her in the same set of ...

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Congo records first causality of Ebola virus- Health Ministry

KINSHASA: A person in Democratic Republic of Congo who died of a hemorrhagic fever has tested positive for the Ebola virus, signaling the start of a new outbreak, the Health Ministry and the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday. The case was confirmed from tests on nine people who came down with a hemorrhagic fever in Bas-Uele province in ...

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Women using long-acting contraception less likely to use condoms

REUTERS: College women using long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), like IUDs or hormonal implants, may be less likely to get pregnant but more vulnerable to sexually transmitted disease compared to peers not on LARCs, a U.S. study finds. Among sexually active women, those who used LARC methods were more than two times less likely to have used a condom in their ...

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British hospitals say hit by suspected national cyber attack

LONDON: British hospitals said they were forced to divert emergencies on Friday (May 12) after a suspected national cyber attack. The National Health Service said that it was responding to a cyber-attack, which hospitals across the country said had caused them to cancel appointments and divert patients. “We are aware of a cyber security incident and we are working on a ...

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Nutrition and health claims to be prohibited on formula milk: AVA

  SINGAPORE: Formula milk manufacturers will not be able to use nutrition and health claims, as well as images that make drinking formula milk look attractive, once changes to Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority (AVA) regulations take effect. AVA will also streamline its import regulations in order to facilitate the entry of more suppliers and brands of formula milk. These changes ...

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Home blood pressure monitors may not be accurate enough: Study

TORONTO: Even as doctors are increasingly relying on home blood pressure monitoring to manage patients with hypertension, many of the devices are too inaccurate to be useful, according to a small study. About 70 per cent of the time, home monitors weren’t accurate within 5 mmHg, which is considered clinically important, researchers say. And 30 per cent of the time ...

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NPA MD Hadiza Usman links healthy lifestyle to improved productivity

  (TRADE NEWSWIRE): As part of efforts to sensitise the officers and staff of the Nigerian Ports Authority (NPA) towards improved productivity at all times, the Managing Director, NPA, Hadiza Bala Usman has urged the workforce to consistently engage in various forms of exercise in their leisure time and also consumes food items that boosts immunity; and increases healthy living ...

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Aging, diseases to push global health bill to $8.7trn

An aging population and associated chronic disease, innovative clinical advancements, and rising technology and labour costs could drive global healthcare costs to reach $8.7 trillion by 2020, up from $7 trillion in 2015, a report said. “Today’s health care demand and cost challenges appear likely to persist in the near-term, if not longer. Stakeholders need to address these risks to ...

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Over the counter painkillers linked to hearing loss

Regular use of pain relievers over many years may increase the risk of hearing loss, a recent study suggests. Researchers analyzed long-term data on almost 56,000 U.S. women and found using non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDS) like naproxen (Aleve) and ibuprofen (Motrin) as well as acetaminophen (Tylenol) for six years or more was tied to a greater risk of hearing problems than ...

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Almost half HIV infections worldwide undetected: WHO

  GENEVA: The World Health Organisation warned on Tuesday that nearly half of all people with HIV around the globe do not know they are infected, and called for broader access to at-home testing kits. The UN health agency said that 40 per cent of people with the virus that causes AIDS, or more than 14 million people worldwide, are ...

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Philip Morris CEO looks towards phasing out cigarettes: BBC

LONDON: Philip Morris International , the world’s largest international tobacco company, could eventually stop selling cigarettes, its chief executive told the BBC on Wednesday, as it launched its alternative product IQOS in Britain. The company’s IQOS smokeless cigarette, which is already on sale in over a dozen markets including Japan, Switzerland and Italy, heats tobacco enough to produce a vapor ...

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More than 18 million on HIV treatment, a million more than 2015: UNAIDS

        LONDON, Nov 21 – More than 18 million people now have access to life-saving AIDS treatment, 1.2 million more than at the end of last year, the United Nations said on Monday. In a report on the AIDS pandemic, which has infected 78 million people and killed 35 million since it began in the 1980s, UNAIDS ...

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WHO advises proper washing in fight against hospital superbugs

  LONDON: Patients going for surgery should bathe or shower beforehand but their surgical site should not be shaved, and antibiotics should be used to prevent infections before and during surgery, but not afterwards, the World Health Organisation said on Thursday (Nov 3). In new guidelines aimed at halting the spread of potentially deadly superbug infections in hospitals and clinics ...

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Infant deaths during home birth often tied to delivery problems

When U.S. babies die during home births, the cause is most often labor and delivery complications, birth defects or infections, a recent study suggests. Infant mortality in the U.S. is rare. The death rate for midwife-attended home births was the highest, though, with almost 13 fatalities for every 10,000 deliveries, the study found. That compares with roughly 6 deaths for ...

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Wars and dogs complicate WHO’s bid to kill off Guinea worm

  GENEVA: The World Health Organization’s battle to eradicate Guinea worm is being hampered by conflict and infections in dogs but cases have fallen to just 17 so far in 2016, the doctor leading the fight told Reuters on Wednesday. The debilitating parasite afflicted 3.5 million people 30 years ago but is now endemic in only four countries: South Sudan, ...

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Palliative care should be standard in cancer treatment: Guideline

CALIFORNIA: For patients with advanced cancer, palliative care should start early and be an integral part of treatment, not just something added on near the end of life, according to a new practice guideline from the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO). Expanding on a 2012 opinion, the guideline authors say that caregivers of advanced-cancer patients and early-stage cancer patients ...

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Exclusive: Global tobacco treaty leaders propose ejecting delegates with ties to industry

NEW YORK/NEW DELHI: The leadership of a World Health Organization (WHO) treaty aimed at controlling tobacco could be about to get tougher with the global tobacco industry. Delegates at a conference next week on controlling tobacco with ties to the business could be refused credentials and ejected, according to an internal document seen by Reuters. The proposal, if adopted by ...

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Brexit threatens supply of new drugs, report warns

LONDON: British patients could end up not being able to access modern medicines if there is a “hard Brexit”, a think tank report endorsed by a former Conservative health minister warned on Wednesday. Drugmakers currently use the European Medicines Agency as a one-stop-shop to get drugs licensed across Europe, but Britain is likely to drop out of that system if ...

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Pfizer profit just misses; company scraps cholesterol drug

REUTERS: Pfizer Inc , the largest U.S. drugmaker, reported a quarterly adjusted profit that just missed analysts’ estimates, and the company shaved 4 cents off its 2016 earnings forecast after scrapping development of a cholesterol-lowering treatment. The drugmaker earned 61 cents per share in the third quarter, excluding special items, missing the average analyst estimate by 1 cent, according to ...

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Air pollution kills 600,000 children yearly: Unicef

  Around 600,000 children under age five die every year from diseases caused by or aggravated by outdoor and indoor air pollution, Unicef said on Monday, a week ahead of the COP 22 in Marrakesh, Morocco. “Pollutants don’t only harm children’s developing lungs – they can actually cross the blood-brain barrier and permanently damage their developing brains – and, thus, ...

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Bypass surgery may be better than stents for patients who skip meds

NEW YORK: For heart disease patients who adhere to optimal medical therapy, outcomes of coronary bypass graft surgery (CABG) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) may not differ, a new study finds. However, among non-adherent patients, CABG affords better major adverse cardiac event–free survival. When they don’t take their meds as directed, CABG patients are 68 per cent more likely to ...

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Work environment may moderate menopause misery

  MELBOURNE: Women experiencing menopause symptoms like hot flashes and sleeping problems do better if they have a comfortable workplace and a supportive boss, according to an Australian study. By offering support to menopausal women, such as trained managers and temperature controls, workplaces can improve the employee experience and help themselves by boosting productivity, the researchers write in the journal ...

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Coke and Pepsi sponsor groups trying to wean US off soda

Coca-Cola and PepsiCo made donations to nearly 100 influential U.S. public health organizations from 2011 to 2015 in an effort to silence groups that might otherwise push for laws regulating soda, researchers contend. Over the same five-year period, the two beverage giants lobbied against at least 28 soda taxes and other measures intended to curb consumption of sugary drinks and ...

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Why women should wait to get pregnant after weight loss surgery

SEATTLE: Babies born less than two years after their mothers have weight loss surgery may face a higher risk of serious complications than infants delivered after more time has passed, a US study suggests. Because obesity is linked to fertility issues, undergoing so-called bariatric surgery to shed excess weight can make it easier for some women to get pregnant. But ...

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Innovative technologies ‘to drive hospitality sector’

  Global technology leader Cisco has called for the regional hospitality sector to invest in innovative technologies to not only remain competitive but also differentiate their services to meet unique and fast evolving guest expectations. The hotel industry estimates that over 300 new hotels will open in the Middle East and Africa in 2017. The UAE accounts for nearly 20 ...

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Support for marijuana legalisation rises among US adults: Poll

WASHINGTON: Support for legalisation of marijuana has risen to nearly 60 per cent among US adults, according to a study published on Wednesday (Oct 12), marking a near reversal of attitudes held only a decade ago. More relaxed views about marijuana have led around two dozen states to allow legal access of some type of the drug and more US ...

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More evidence links high sodium intake to risk of death

  BOSTON: Keeping sodium intake low may prolong life according to a new study that set out to clarify the long-term risk of eating too much sodium and the benefits of cutting down. Based on following more than 3,000 people with elevated blood pressure for over 24 years, researchers found that risk of death from any cause rose in a ...

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WHO urges tax hike on sugary drinks

  Taxing sugary drinks can lower consumption and reduce obesity, type 2 diabetes and tooth decay, says a new World Health Organization (WHO) report. Fiscal policies that lead to at least a 20 per cent increase in the retail price of sugary drinks would result in proportional reductions in consumption of such products, according to the report titled Fiscal policies ...

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Ageist attitudes ‘affect older people’s health’

  New analysis by the World Health Organization (WHO) shows that negative or ageist attitudes towards older people are widespread. They also negatively affect older people’s physical and mental health. Fully 60 per cent of respondents in the WHO World Values Survey reported that older people are not respected. More than 83,000 people in 57 countries took part in the ...

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Zuckerberg pledges $3bn to fight disease

  Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan on Wednesday pledged more than $3 billion toward a plan to “cure, prevent or manage all disease within our children’s lifetime.” Speaking through tears at a San Francisco event to announce the initiative, Chan said she hoped to spare parents the pain she had seen while delivering difficult news ...

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Just going on vacation may change gene activity

  In a new study comparing a meditation retreat with just relaxing in the same locale, both options improved stress regulation, immune function and other cellular markers in the blood. Researchers measured gene activity, blood markers and reported wellbeing during the vacation and months afterward, and found a large and immediate “vacation effect” in all participants. For those who continued ...

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Global fund raises $13bn to fight AIDS, malaria

  A global fund has raised over $12.9 billion from international donors as part of a campaign aimed at effectively eradicating AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis by 2030, conference organizers said on Saturday. The Global Fund asked government, faith-based and private-sector partners to raise a total of $13 billion at a donor conference in Montreal to support its activities over the ...

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$65bn healthcare projects under way in GCC

  More than 700 healthcare construction projects, with a combined estimated value of $65 billion, are currently being developed in the GCC region, said a report. Of these, 133 projects are worth more than $100 million each, stated the latest BNC Report on the GCC Healthcare commissioned by The Big 5 Kuwait 2016, the largest building and construction event in ...

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Zika could live in eyes, spread through tears: Study

WASHINGTON: The Zika virus can live in eyes, researchers said on Tuesday (Sep 6), after conducting experiments on mice that may explain why some patients develop ocular disease and in some cases become blind. The study, published in the journal Cell Reports, studied the effects of Zika virus infection in the eyes of foetal, newborn and adult mice. “Our study ...

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Sexual function problems common for younger adults after heart attack

In the year after a heart attack, people younger than age 55 often have difficulties with sexual function, according to a study of patients in the U.S. and Spain. “A large proportion of men and women with no prior sexual problems developed one or more sexual problems in the year after heart attack. However, women are far less likely to ...

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Ignoring a minor stroke ups risk for more strokes soon after

   People who have a minor stroke – or even a mini-stroke – are at serious risk for further strokes in the next few days, but many people delay going to the hospital because they do not recognize the symptoms, UK researchers warn. Often for these kinds of stroke, experts recommend surgery within 48 hours to unclog a major artery ...

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Classroom standing desks may help kids slim down

Standing desks in classrooms could help children maintain a healthy body weight, a new study suggests. These desks are set at a height that allows students to alternate between sitting on a stool or standing while working. Standing desks “can interrupt sedentary behavior patterns” while kids are in school, “simply, at a low cost, and without disrupting classroom instruction time,” ...

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Danaher to buy Cepheid for about US$4 billion, including debt

  REUTERS: Danaher Corp said on Tuesday it would buy molecular diagnostics company Cepheid in a deal valued at US$4 billion, including debt, to strengthen its diagnostics unit. Danaher will pay Cepheid US$53 per share in cash, a premium of 54 percent to its Friday close of US$34.42, and the transaction is expected to close in the fourth quarter. The ...

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Vitamin D tablets may help reduce asthma attacks, review finds

LONDON: The world’s 300 million asthma sufferers could help reduce their risk of severe asthma attacks by taking vitamin D supplements as well as their standard asthma medicines, according to the findings of a review of international trial evidence. The analysis – which covered trials in the United States, Canada, India, Japan, Poland and Britain – found that taking vitamin ...

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Research links eczema and hay fever to early antibiotic use

  LONDON: Babies given antibiotics in the first two years of life are more likely to develop allergies as adults, according to an extensive analysis of past clinical studies involving nearly 400,000 people. The findings, to be presented on Tuesday at the European Respiratory Society annual meeting in London, point to a clear association with the risk of eczema or ...

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ASEAN should prepare for possibly extended campaign against Zika: PM Lee

  VIENTIANE, Laos: Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong on Tuesday (Sep 6) urged the Association of Southeast Nations (ASEAN) to join hands in fighting a possibly extended campaign against the Zika virus. Speaking at the 28th ASEAN Summit plenary in Laos, Mr Lee said that Singapore has immediately stepped up measures since the number of locally transmitted cases jumped ...

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WHO emergency committee on yellow fever to meet on August 30

  GENEVA: The World Health Organization’s (WHO) emergency committee on deadly yellow fever will meet on Aug. 30 to review outbreaks in Democratic Republic of Congo and Angola, a spokesman said on Tuesday, as a major vaccination campaigns continues. Addressing a United Nations media briefing, Tarik Jasarevic said WHO Director-General Margaret Chan had asked the independent experts to meet and ...

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Women with dense breasts may need annual mammograms

While most older women might not need breast cancer screening with mammography more often than every three years, some women with dense breasts may need mammograms every year, U.S. research suggests. Among women aged 50 to 74, those without a high risk for breast cancer or dense breast tissue didn’t have an increase in breast cancer deaths if they went ...

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11 premature babies killed in Baghdad hospital fire

At least 11 prematurely born babies were killed in a fire that broke out in the early hours of Wednesday on a maternity ward in a Baghdad hospital and was probably caused by an electrical fault, the health ministry said. Seven other babies and 29 women were rescued from the Yarmuk hospital’s maternity ward and transferred to another hospital, the ...

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Future of drug pricing: paying for benefits not per pill

LONDON: Global pressure on health spending is forcing the US$1 trillion-a-year pharmaceutical industry to look for new ways to price its products: charging based on how much they improve patients’ health, rather than how many pills or vials are sold. In the United States, both parties are promising fresh action on drug prices whoever wins the White House. In Europe, ...

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Fake Cruise Ship Doctor Sentenced to Three Years

    A nurse who fraudulently identified himself as a doctor and found employment on an Aida cruise ship has been sentenced to more than three years in prison for “the deprivation of liberty associated with anesthesia, fraud, forgery and abuse of title.” The man, identified in the German press as Denny H., had worked for a decade as a ...

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Freezing eggs ‘offers chance to preserve fertility’

Freezing eggs provides women with a chance to preserve their fertility, says a specialist doctor. The technology provides the option to prolong a woman’s fertility timeline to ensure that they don’t miss out on receiving all of the joys of motherhood, according to Dr Monika Chawla, specialist OBGYN-IVF at Bareen International Hospital in Abu Dhabi, UAE. This can be achieved ...

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UK court says state health system can fund preventative HIV drug

LONDON: A high court judge ruled on Tuesday that an HIV pill to prevent infection could be funded by the state health service in England, in a victory for AIDS campaigners who have been calling for its wider use. So-called pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV, using Gilead Sciences’ medicine Truvada, can cut the risk of getting the virus during sex ...

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GSK and Google parent forge US$715 million bioelectronic medicines firm

LONDON: GlaxoSmithKline and Google parent Alphabet’s life sciences unit are creating a new company focused on fighting diseases by targeting electrical signals in the body, jump-starting a novel field of medicine called bioelectronics. Verily Life Sciences – known as Google’s life sciences unit until last year – and Britain’s biggest drugmaker will together contribute 540 million pounds (US$715 million) over ...

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Programme launched to help reduce kidney deterioration in diabetic patients

SINGAPORE: A new programme developed by local healthcare services may help reduce kidney deterioration in diabetic patients, the National University Hospital (NUH) and the National Healthcare Group Polyclinics (NHGP) announced on Monday (Aug 1). The programme, called the Nephrology Evaluation, Management and Optimisation (NEMO) Programme, is an enhanced collaborative disease management initiative by NUH and NHGP. Under the programme, NEMO ...

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Meet Nigeria’s curious Cupid – matchmaking for HIV patients looking for love

 ABUJA – Sitting in his dimly-lit office in the Nigerian capital of Abuja, surrounded by files and boxes of condoms, matchmaker Ugochukwu Michael talks passionately about the part he has played in the marriages of around 100 couples in recent years. While the popularity of dating apps and websites may make Michael’s efforts to play Cupid seem old-fashioned, his ...

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X-Ray Telemedicine Comes to Cruise Ships

  This month, Carnival subsidiary AIDA Cruises announced a telemedicine partnership with the Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology at Rostock University, which will allow shipboard medical personnel to share x-ray and ultrasound imagery with specialists on shore.Telemedicine is increasingly common on shore, where primary care providers in outlying locations can share live video feed, imagery or other information with ...

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First baby with Zika-related defect born in Spain

Spain has recorded its first case of a baby born with the microcephaly birth defect associated to the Zika virus, health authorities said on Monday. The mother had been diagnosed with the virus in May and had decided to keep the baby, a spokeswoman for the regional health authorities of Catalonia, where the baby was born, told Reuters.

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FDA raises concerns over Valeant’s eye drop

Valeant Pharmaceuticals International said on Friday U.S. regulators have raised concerns over a new eye drop manufactured at a Bausch + Lomb facility in Florida. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, in a complete response letter (CRL) regarding the eye drop for a type of glaucoma, raised concerns over Current Good Manufacturing Practice at the unit. The letter did not ...

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Early bedtime for preschoolers may ward off teen obesity

It’s never too early to get kids into good sleep habits, and those habits might even protect against obesity later in life, a recent U.S. study suggests. Preschoolers who were in bed by 8 p.m. were half as likely to be obese 10 years later as their peers who were still up after 9 p.m., researchers report in the Journal ...

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Indulge in a gastronomic journey with Le Méridien Dubai

Le Meridien Dubai Hotel & Conference Centre has announced the launch of ‘Culinary Compass’, a one-of-a-kind passport that takes you on an exciting gastronomic journey through the hotel’s 18 global restaurants, all in one destination. Food lovers are in for a delight as they receive discounts on their food adventure. Restaurants and bars participating in the Culinary Compass adventure include ...

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Bird flu outbreak in west Africa raises worries about food and livelihoods

The outbreak of a highly contagious strain of avian flu in west and central Africa has stoked fears that the disease may become endemic in the region, with lasting implications for people’s livelihoods, the U.N. food agency said on Friday. H5N1 avian influenza, or bird flu, has spread across a number of West African countries in the past two years, ...

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Could fruit and veg boost happiness?

The reasons experts usually give for eating more fruit and vegetables tend to be about long-term health benefits, but piling on the produce may also improve wellbeing in the shorter term, researchers say. Based on national surveys in Australia, the study team linked increases in fruit and vegetable servings per day to rising happiness over two years. With the addition ...

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Suspected Congo yellow fever cases up 38 percent in last three weeks: WHO

KINSHASA: The number of suspected yellow fever cases in the Democratic Republic of Congo has jumped 38 percent in the last three weeks, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday, as health officials prepare to launch a vaccination campaign next week. Congo’s government last month declared a yellow fever epidemic in the capital Kinshasa and two provinces that border ...

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More evidence poor sleep habits may raise diabetes risk

Men who don’t get the right amount of sleep may have an increased risk of developing diabetes, a recent study suggests. Plenty of previous research has linked sleep problems to diabetes, but the reasons behind this connection still aren’t well understood, said lead study author Femke Rutters of Vrije University Medical Center in Amsterdam. The current study looked at one ...

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Kids who watch lots of TV have lower bone mass as adults

Kids who watch a lot of television may build less bone during critical years, and be more vulnerable to osteoporosis and bone breaks later in life as a result, a new study suggests. Children and teens followed until age 20 – when bone mass is peaking – had lower bone mass at that age the more hours they had spent ...

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Smoking during pregnancy may hurt your chances for grandkids

Women who smoke during pregnancy run the risk of having boys with low sperm production in adulthood, an Australian study suggests. “It is harder for men with low sperm counts to conceive children, or it may take a longer time to make the partner pregnant,” said Dr. Christine Wohlfahrt-Veje, a researcher at the University of Copenhagen who wasn’t involved in ...

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Yogurt maker Dannon considers ways to cut more sugar

NEW YORK: U.S. yogurt maker Dannon, a unit of France’s Danone , is looking at ways to make its products less sweet, in the latest industry response to rising concerns about excessive sugar consumption. The company, whose brands include Dannon, Oikos and Activia, is working with the American Heart Association and other health groups to find ways to reduce sugar ...

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Obama to sign bill to battle heroin addiction

WASHINGTON: U.S. President Barack Obama will sign legislation passed by Congress aimed at combating a nationwide epidemic of heroin and other opioid addictions, the White House said on Wednesday. After months of wrangling, the Senate voted overwhelmingly on Wednesday, 92-2, to pass the bill that has also been approved by the U.S. House of Representatives. The measure aims to help ...

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AIDS conference returns to a changed South Africa

JOHANNESBURG: The South Africa that hosts a global AIDS Conference next week has come a long way from the “AIDS pariah” that did so 16 years ago, when then President Thabo Mbeki stunningly dismissed the link between HIV and the disease. At the epicenter of the worldwide AIDS pandemic, South Africa now boasts the largest treatment program in the world, ...

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Nissan cuts carbon dioxide emissions by 22.4pc

Nissan Motor has cut its carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 22.4 per cent over the past decade, the automaker said in its annual Sustainability Report. Nissan’s success in reducing emissions, promoting zero-emission vehicles and saving energy at its facilities has made it the highest-performing automotive company tracked by the Carbon Disclosure Project, which works with thousands of companies to tackle ...

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UN food agency says faces 610 million dollars shortfall for southern Africa drought relief

JOHANNESBURG: The United Nations’ food agency said on Thursday it needed US$730 million over the next 12 months for relief in seven southern African countries hit hard by a blistering drought and faced a US$610 million shortfall. (Reporting by Ed Stoddard; Editing by James Macharia) – Reuters

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Girls less likely to get pregnant if a friend has a baby

Girls whose friends have experienced teen childbirth are less likely to get pregnant themselves, a new study suggests. The researchers compared two groups of teen girls: those with a similarly-aged friend who’d given birth, and those with a friend who’d had an early miscarriage. They wanted to see whether these events affected the girls’ choices in having sex, getting pregnant, ...

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Smoking linked to inflammation, sperm damage in men

The sperm of men who smoke, compared to those who don’t, have more damaged DNA, fewer active energy-generating mitochondria and more proteins indicating a revved up immune response, according to a small study. Past research has found that smokers tend to have more abnormal sperm in terms of number, motility, shape and structures known as acrosomes that help sperm penetrate ...

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Hundreds of US companies sell unapproved ‘stem cell treatments’

MIAMI: Hundreds of companies across the United States are selling unapproved stem cell treatments directly to patients, raising concerns about safety and scams in a fast-growing industry, researchers said on Thursday (Jun 30). At least 351 companies across the United States are marketing unapproved stem cell procedures at 570 individual clinics, their report in the journal Cell Stem Cell found. ...

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Health officials race to prevent Congo yellow fever disaster

DAKAR: It is the stuff of a disaster movie: an outbreak of yellow fever in Congo’s capital city, full of unvaccinated people mostly huddled together in slums with too few drains and the kind of sticky, fetid climate that mosquitoes love. Kinshasa’s 12 million people – twice as many as there are doses of yellow fever vaccine anywhere in the ...

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Smokers may try to quit 30 times before it sticks

Though conventional wisdom says it takes five to seven attempts for most smokers to quit, those estimates may be very low, a recent study suggests. Based on data for more than 1,200 adult smokers in Canada, the real average number of quit attempts before succeeding may be closer to 30. “For so long we’ve been talking about five to seven ...

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WHO says 122 million dollars needed for global response to Zika virus

LONDON: Almost US$122 million is needed to prevent and manage the medical complications of the Zika virus spreading throughout the Americas and causing birth defects in babies, the World Health Organization said on Friday. A specific focus is needed on supporting women and girls of child-bearing age, the UN health agency said as it set out a revised joint strategy ...

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Very hot drinks ‘probably’ cause cancer: UN body

PARIS: Drinking very hot beverages “probably” causes cancer of the oesophagus, the UN’s cancer agency said on Wednesday (Jun 15), while lifting suspicion from coffee if consumed at “normal serving temperatures”. “These results suggest that drinking very hot beverages is one probable cause of oesophageal cancer and that it is the temperature, rather than the drinks themselves, that appears to ...

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FDA targets sugar in new labeling rules

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it would update guidelines for nutritional labels on packaged food and beverages to include information on added sugar and to prominently display calorie count and servings. The move comes at a time the United States is staring at increasing childhood and adult obesity and lifestyle diseases such as heart problems. The FDA said ...

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Experts list proven benefits of exercise for postmenopausal women

Following an exercise program during and after menopause can both reduce menopausal symptoms and preserve heart, muscle, bone and brain health, according to a panel of experts in Spain. Members of the Spanish Menopause Society, Spanish Cardiology Society and Spanish Federation of Sports Medicine came together to draft recommendations on physical activity for older women and reviewed the quality of ...

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Many cancers tied to lifestyle factors

Many cancers in the U.S. could be avoided if Americans adopted healthier lifestyles, according to a new study. People could cut back on their cancer risk by maintaining a healthy body weight, exercising, not abusing alcohol and not smoking, the study suggests. The findings challenge the results of a 2015 report in the journal Science that attributed many cancers simply ...

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CDC says 157 pregnant women in US test positive for Zika

Some 157 pregnant women in the United States and another 122 in U.S. territories have tested positive for infection with the Zika virus, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Friday. It was the first time the agency had disclosed the number of Zika-infected pregnant women in the U.S. and its territories. U.S. health officials have previously ...

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Global life expectancy increases by 5 years

Global life expectancy has increased by five years since 2000, touted as the fastest increase since the 1960s. The increase was greatest in Africa where it rose by 9.4 years. The gains reverse declines during the 1990s, when life expectancy fell in Africa because of the AIDS epidemic and in Eastern Europe following the fall of the Soviet Union. The ...

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Panama confirms four microcephaly cases tied to Zika

PANAMA CITY: Four babies born with microcephaly linked to the Zika virus have been confirmed in Panama, the health ministry said on Wednesday, out of 264 total cases of the mosquito-borne infection in the country. Public health officials have been concerned about the possibility of a surge in the rare birth defect, seen in worrisome numbers in Brazil, as the ...

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Patients with mental illness fare worse after hip surgery

People with psychiatric illnesses are more likely to have complications after hip replacement surgery, according to a recent analysis. This added risk is something doctors and patients should discuss in advance, the study team writes in The Journal of Arthroplasty. Previous studies have linked depression and other mental illnesses to greater complications after surgery and worse outcomes for patients, the ...

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Parasitic worms may hold key to cutting spread of HIV: researchers

Posted 28 Apr 2016 19:25 Email More A A LONDON- A parasitic worm which affects millions of the world’s poorest people may hold an important but little-known key to cutting the spread of HIV, researchers said ahead of a conference on the issue in London. Schistosomiasis affects at least 250 million people. It is caused by parasitic worms, picked up ...

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Is death reversible?

We are repeatedly told through the medical establishment that brain death is “irreversible” and should be considered the end of the line. Or is it? Two biosciences companies are studying a clinical intervention in the state of death. Bioquark, a company focused on the development of novel biologics for complex regeneration and disease reversion, and Revita Life Sciences, a biotechnology ...

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Teens most drawn to e-cigarettes by online ads

While many forms of e-cigarette advertising increase the odds that teens will try the devices, a new U.S. study suggests that this generation of digital natives is most enticed by promotions they see online. Big U.S. tobacco companies are all developing e-cigarettes. The battery-powered gadgets feature a glowing tip and a heating element that turns liquid nicotine and other flavorings ...

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WHO warns of potential for ‘marked increase’ in Zika cases

PARIS: The World Health Organization warned Monday (Apr 25) of the potential for a “marked increase” in the number of Zika infections in the coming months, and its spread to new parts of the world. With mosquito season arriving in Europe, “the possibility of local transmission combined with the likelihood of onward sexual transmission could see a marked increase in ...

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Angola yellow fever outbreak exposes vaccine supply dilemma

LONDON: The worst yellow fever outbreak in decades has killed 250 people in Angola and is straining global vaccine supplies, posing a dilemma for health officials who fear it could spread further in Africa and possibly into Asia. Some experts have called for a radical switch in strategy to use just one-tenth of the usual vaccine dose to conserve scarce ...

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Bayer to consider selling animal health if unable to bulk up: CEO

LEVERKUSEN, Germany: Bayer will look into divesting its animal health unit if it continues to struggle to find takeover targets to bulk up the division, the German drugmaker’s incoming chief executive said. “Animal Health is a business that we have been trying for many years to strengthen strategically, that is to say inorganically. That is still our goal,” strategy chief ...

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Yellow fever outbreak kills 21 in Congo, WHO says

GENEVA: Twenty-one people have died of yellow fever in Democratic Republic of Congo, some of them from infections contracted in neighboring Angola, the World Health Organization said on Tuesday. An outbreak has already killed 225 people and infected 1,600 in Angola. There was now a high risk of further spread in Congo, given the number of people who regularly travel ...

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Biosimilar drugs could save up to US$110 billion by 2020: IMS

LONDON: Lower-cost copies of complex biotech drugs, known as biosimilars, could save the United States and Europe’s five top markets as much as 98 billion euros (US$110 bln) by 2020, a new analysis showed on Tuesday. Realizing those savings, however, depends on effective doctor education and healthcare providers adopting smart market access strategies, the report by IMS Institute for Healthcare ...

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Driving to work linked to a fatter middle age

Choosing an active way to get to work could make a big difference in how much weight creeps on in middle age, a large U.K. study suggests. Studying tens of thousands of commuters over age 40, researchers found that people who drove to work weighed more and had a higher percentage of body fat than those who got to work ...

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Popular music often takes negative view of aging

Music can powerfully influence mood, and for older people, the negative depictions of aging in most popular music can be a downer, researchers say. They analyzed images of aging conveyed in 76 songs whose lyrics invoke the topic. Most images were negative, they found. “We’re aware that the number of people over age 60 will probably double by 2050, and ...

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Environment behind nearly quarter of global deaths: WHO

  GENEVA: One in four deaths worldwide are due to environmental factors like air, water and soil pollution, as well as unsafe roads and workplace stress, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Tuesday (Mar 15). An estimated 12.6 million people died in 2012 as a result of living and working in unhealthy environments, 23 per cent of all deaths ...

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Lagos-Mile 12 clash: ‘Stop spreading tribal-hate reports that could aggravate violence’

(TRADE NEWSWIRE): I urge Nigerians, especially ‘Opinion leaders’, be it individual(s) or corporate entity, to please be modest and decorous in the kind of information shared on social media and other media platforms with respect to the Lagos-Mile 12 clash, so as not to help sow seeds of hatred in the minds of vulnerable Nigerians which could further aggravate the ...

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